Three Lines, Three Photographs, Three Days: Band of the Banded

For today – the last day of the challenge – I was planning on a portrait I had taken during the summer. When I skimmed some old photographs, however, I came across this one, and found it fitted the theme better than the other two, at least. 😛

Banded mongooses, the creatively named Mungos mungo, are the most commonly found mongoose on the Masai Mara. Their groups average around 20 but can be up to 70 in number. In the photograph below, it was evening, and after a long day’s foraging, this band of three (pun intended) were returning to their den. For more information on banded mongooses, I highly recommend checking out bandedmongoose.org, an ongoing research project by the University of Exeter on their fascinating behavioral tendencies and social quirks.

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I would like to note that for this challenge, black and white was not mandatory: it merely happened so that all my photographs turned out that way!

Three Lines, Three Photographs, Three Days: Necks

Today is a fairly loose interpretation of the challenge. (Then again, so was yesterday’s.) In my defense, it’s exam week; I don’t have the time to go out and take new photographs, so I’m stuck with my archives. For this one I went all the way back to Kenya – not geographically, of course, though that would have been lovely. 😛

This was the biggest journey, i.e. group, of giraffes we saw the whole trip. While most usually contain about five or six animals, this one had almost twenty. A mixture of juveniles, young uns, and adults, they barely shifted position and we had numerous opportunities to observe going to and fro from our camp. Unlike most wildlife photographs I took during the trip, this was made with a wide-angle lens.

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