Dwarfish

Dwarf Mongoose

There are two species of mongoose regularly seen on the Maasai Mara. The more common is the banded mongoose, but the dwarf mongoose – a small African carnivore found in groups of 15 or less – is also spotted, though less frequently. I expected to leave Kenya with that added to my list of ‘what I’d wished I seen’, places the secretary bird and martial eagle then seemed destined to live.

But a curious combination of fate and luck conspired to the ends of preventing disappointment. When at the checkpoint between the Mara Triangle Wilderness Zone and the Maasai Mara National Reserve, I got out the jeep – with my camera, of course – to stretch my legs.

This proved to be a very good decision.

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Not only did I spot a new species of weaver (which *hint hint cough cough* I have still not identified and therefore has not been added to the Grand Bird List yet), I also saw a small group of mongooses heading off into the shrubbery. One particularly curious individual had perched himself on a rock to observe the surroundings before they all disappeared.

I held my breath, and crept closer very, very slowly. I could see the mongoose tensing, getting ready to run. Luckily, he delayed his flight till the last moment.

Dwarf-size mongoose, maybe. Dwarf-size experience? Definitely not.

Three Lines, Three Photographs, Three Days: Necks

Today is a fairly loose interpretation of the challenge. (Then again, so was yesterday’s.) In my defense, it’s exam week; I don’t have the time to go out and take new photographs, so I’m stuck with my archives. For this one I went all the way back to Kenya – not geographically, of course, though that would have been lovely. 😛

This was the biggest journey, i.e. group, of giraffes we saw the whole trip. While most usually contain about five or six animals, this one had almost twenty. A mixture of juveniles, young uns, and adults, they barely shifted position and we had numerous opportunities to observe going to and fro from our camp. Unlike most wildlife photographs I took during the trip, this was made with a wide-angle lens.

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